sábado, 27 de agosto de 2016

cholangiocarcinoma - Genetics Home Reference

cholangiocarcinoma - Genetics Home Reference

Genetics Home Reference, Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions





08/23/2016 11:30 PM EDT

Source: National Library of Medicine - NIH
Related MedlinePlus Page: Bile Duct Cancer




cholangiocarcinoma





Cholangiocarcinoma is a group of cancers that begin in the bile ducts. Bile ducts are branched tubes that connect the liver and gallbladder to the small intestine. They carry bile, which is a fluid that helps the body digest the fats in food. Bile is produced in the liver and stored in the gallbladder before being released in the small intestine after a person eats.
Cholangiocarcinoma is classified by its location in relation to the liver. Intrahepaticcholangiocarcinoma begins in the small bile ducts within the liver. This is the least common form of the disease, accounting for less than 10 percent of all cases. Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (also known as a Klatskin tumor) begins in an area called the hilum, where two major bile ducts join and leave the liver. It is the most common form of the disease, accounting for more than half of all cases. The remaining cases are classified as distal cholangiocarcinomas, which begin in bile ducts outside the liver. The perihilar and distal forms of the disease, which both occur outside the liver, are sometimes grouped together and called extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.
The three types of cholangiocarcinoma do not usually cause any symptoms in their early stages, and this cancer is usually not diagnosed until it has already spread beyond the bile ducts to other tissues. Symptoms often result when bile ducts become blocked by the tumor. The most common symptom is jaundice, which is a yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes. Other symptoms can include itching, dark-colored urine, loss of appetite, unintentional weight loss, abdominal pain, and light-colored and greasy stools. These symptoms are described as "nonspecific" because they can be features of many different diseases.
Most people who develop cholangiocarcinoma are older than 65. Because this cancer is often not discovered until it has already spread, it can be challenging to treat effectively. Affected individuals can survive for several months to several years after diagnosis.


Stomach Ulcer | Peptic Ulcer | MedlinePlus [NEW TOPIC PAGE]

Stomach Ulcer | Peptic Ulcer | MedlinePlus



MedlinePlus Trusted Health Information for You



08/23/2016 08:44 AM EDT
Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)
Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases - NIH
Related MedlinePlus Page: Peptic Ulcer
08/23/2016 08:44 AM EDT
Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)
Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases - NIH
Related MedlinePlus Page: Peptic Ulcer
08/23/2016 08:44 AM EDT
Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)
Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases - NIH
Related MedlinePlus Page: Peptic Ulcer
08/23/2016 08:44 AM EDT
Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)
Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases - NIH
Related MedlinePlus Page: Peptic Ulcer


Illustration of stomach ulcers





National Institutes of Health

The primary NIH organization for research on Peptic Ulcer is theNational Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

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Summary

A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your small intestine. A burning stomach pain is the most common symptom. The pain
  • Starts between meals or during the night
  • Briefly stops if you eat or take antacids
  • Lasts for minutes to hours
  • Comes and goes for several days or weeks
Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest food damage the walls of the stomach or duodenum. The most common cause is infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Another cause is the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. Stress and spicy foods do not cause ulcers, but can make them worse.
To see if you have an H. pylori infection, your doctor will test your blood, breath, or stool. Your doctor also may look inside your stomach and duodenum by doing an endoscopy or x-ray.
Peptic ulcers will get worse if not treated. Treatment may include medicines to reduce stomach acids or antibiotics to kill H. pylori. Antacids and milk can't heal peptic ulcers. Not smoking and avoiding alcohol can help. You may need surgery if your ulcers don't heal.
NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

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