viernes, 17 de noviembre de 2017

BULLYING STATISTICS IN 2017 UK Wristbands / Event and Security Solutions

BULLYING STATISTICS IN 2017 UK Wristbands / Event and Security Solutions

UK Wristbands Ltd

Bullying can be defined as a type of aggressive behaviour which is intentional, repeated, and usually involves imbalance of power between the bully and the victim (Olweus, 1993). It’s usually seen among school children, but also among adults in relationships or in workplaces.
This type of aggressive behaviour must be repeated and involve an imbalance of power to be considered bullying.
It’s usually occurring during or after school hours, in school building or playground, but can also happen travelling to or from school, in the neighbourhood or on the Internet.






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BULLYING STATISTICS IN 2017 UK Wristbands / Event and Security Solutions

jueves, 16 de noviembre de 2017

FDA approves sunitinib malate for adjuvant treatment of renal cell carcinoma

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Header

FDA approves sunitinib malate for adjuvant treatment of renal cell carcinoma


    FDA approved sunitinib malate (Sutent, Pfizer Inc.) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients at high risk of recurrent renal cell carcinoma following nephrectomy. More Information.  November 16, 2017

    Other Hematology/Oncology (Cancer) Approvals & Safety Notifications

    Approved Drugs > FDA approves emicizumab-kxwh for prevention and reduction of bleeding in patients with hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors

    Approved Drugs > FDA approves emicizumab-kxwh for prevention and reduction of bleeding in patients with hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration Header

    FDA approves emicizumab-kxwh for prevention and reduction of bleeding in patients with hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors



    FDA approved emicizumab-kxwh (HEMLIBRA, Genentech, Inc.) for routine prophylaxis to prevent or reduce the frequency of bleeding episodes in adult and pediatric patients with hemophilia A (congenital factor VIII deficiency) with factor VIII inhibitors. More Information.  November 16, 2017​

    Other Hematology/Oncology (Cancer) Approvals & Safety Notifications

    Snapshots of Life: Making Sense of Smell | NIH Director's Blog

    Snapshots of Life: Making Sense of Smell | NIH Director's Blog



    Snapshots of Life: Making Sense of Smell

    Modified rendering of mouse olfactory bulb
    Credit: Jeremy McIntyre, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville
    You’ve probably learned the hard way about how the grocery list can go out the window when you go shopping on an empty stomach. Part of the reason is that our sense of smell intensifies when we’re hungry, making the aroma of freshly baked cookies, fried chicken, and other tempting goodies even more noticeable. And this beautiful micrograph helps to provide a biological explanation for this phenomenon.
    The image, which looks like something that Van Gogh might have painted, shows a thick mesh of neurons in a small cross section of a mouse’s olfactory bulb, a structure located in the forebrain of all vertebrates (including humans!) that processes input about odors detected by the nose. Here, you see specialized neurons called mitral cells (red) that can receive signals from the hypothalamus, a brain region known for its role in hunger and energy balance. Also fluorescently labeled are receptors that detect acetylcholine signals from the brain (green) and the nuclei of all cells in the olfactory bulb (blue).
    Studies suggest the hypothalamus relays information about a vertebrate’s current metabolic state and appetite to the olfactory bulb [1]. The mitral cells then integrate that information with incoming odor signals, influencing how intensely the odors are perceived by the organism.
    Jeremy McIntyre, an NIH-supported researcher who studies the biology of smell at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, took this image using a confocal microscope. After a bit of computer enhancement, he entered his shot in the University of Florida’s 2016 Elegance of Science competition, where it captured third prize.
    Although you can’t see it in this static image, mitral cells and granule cells talk among themselves to determine what information goes onto the brain. When one of their signal-receiving arms activates, it can switch others off or on, much like circuits on a circuit board. The Florida team is now exploring this circuit board in an effort to map more precisely the lines of the communication among the hypothalamus, olfactory bulb, and nerve cells in the nose. Such research will be important in understanding how these interactions might contribute to eating disorders, obesity, or even just that craving for a cinnamon bun.
    Reference:
    [1] Neuromodulation in Chemosensory Pathways. McIntyre JC, Thiebaud N, McGann JP, Komiyama T, Rothermel M. Chem Senses. 2017 Jun 1;42(5):375-379.
    Links:
    Olfactory System (PubMed Health/NLM/NIH)
    McIntyre Lab (University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville)
    The Elegance of Science (Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville)
    NIH Support: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

    How Pharmacists Helped Reduce Antibiotic-Related Expenses by 26%

    A Rural Hospital’s Success with Antibiotic Stewardship Through a Pharmacist’s Eyes

    Be Antibiotics AwareA two-hour drive north of New York City you’ll find the rural community of Ellenville, NY, and Ellenville Regional – the village’s award-winning critical access hospital. 
    Led by Mike Stearns, Ellenville Regional Hospital’s Director of Pharmacy, the hospital successfully implemented CDC’s seven core elements of Hospital Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and reduced antibiotic-related expenses by 26%. 
    As part of U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week (USAAW), representatives from Ellenville Regional Hospital, along with CDC, invite you to learn more about the hospital’s successful efforts to improve antibiotic prescribing and use in a rural community. 
    Read Mike Stearns’ Blog 
    In today’s blog, Mike Stearns outlines how the hospital team used an integrated approach – featuring physicians, nurses, pharmacists and staff – to improve antibiotic use and patient outcomes. 
    Participate in This Free Webinar: Be Antibiotics Aware: Antibiotic Stewardship for Critical Access Hospitals
    CDC, in partnership with the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, will co-host this webinar on Thursday, November 16 at 2pm ET. Register here to learn more about implementing a new antibiotic stewardship program (or improving an existing one) in this unique clinical setting
    Be Part of the #AntibioticResistance Global Twitter Chat 
    Join us for the Global Antibiotic Resistance Twitter Chat on Thursday, November 16, 1pm–3pm. Follow @CDCgov and @CDC_NCEZID, and remember to use #AntibioticResistance in each of your tweets!
    Learn how improving abx use helped a pharmacist & his team lower abx-related expenses by 26% https://go.usa.gov/xnWmq

    Cancer Prevention Works: Joan Lunden Shares Her Breast Cancer Story

    Header image: Cancer Prevention Works www.cdc.gov/cancer Reliable, Trusted, Scientific
    Your Health with Joan Lunden and CDC

    Joan Lunden Shares Her Breast Cancer Story in CDC Videos

    Nationally recognized news personality Joan Lunden is a survivor of triple-negative breast cancer (a cancer that doesn’t respond to hormone therapy). In two new, short videos,she shares advice on choosing the right treatment and keeping a positive attitude. “Focusing on the little joys each day helped me maintain a positive attitude throughout my battle,” she says.
    In two other new videos, Ms. Lunden explains how colorectal cancer screening can save lives because it can find cancer early, or even stop it before it starts. Her three-step plan for preventing colorectal cancer: “Know your family history. Talk to your doctor. Choose the screening test that’s right for you.”

    DCPC Advisor Presents at Georgia Tumor Registrars’ Association

    Mary Lewis, CTR, gave a presentation called “Do You Know Where Your Data Go and What It Means?” at the annual meeting of the Georgia Tumor Registrars’ Association in Macon, Georgia on November 6, 2017. The talk was meant to show Georgia-based cancer data collectors that the registry data process begins with their high-quality work and their importance to local, state, and national cancer surveillance.

    Report on Cancer Control in Pacific Island Jurisdictions Available

    The planning committee of the Comprehensive Cancer Control National Partnership, along with George Washington University, has released a report on the Pacific Island Jurisdictions Comprehensive Cancer Control Technical Assistance Workshop, (PDF-9MB) held in May 2017. Workshop attendees looked at community cancer control strategies to increase HPV vaccination and to address colorectal cancer, cancer survivorship, and care at the end of life.

    Two Upcoming Webinars on Colorectal Cancer

    • The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, of which CDC is a member, will host a webinaron colorectal cancer screening in American Indian and Alaska Native communities on November 28, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern time.
    • The American Cancer Society will host a webinar on November 30, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern time, which will look at ways that employers can increase the number of their employees in the recommended age range who get screened for colorectal cancer.

    NCI Presents Datasets on How the Public Uses Electronic Health Info

    The National Cancer Institute has released two datasets from its Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). One set combines HINTS topics about cancer knowledge and cancer risk behaviors with survey answers about the way people use health information technology and electronic medical records. The second set has to do with how the public looks at tobacco products and communication about tobacco products. It was created with the help of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Tobacco Products.

    DCPC’s Latest Publications

    ​​​​​On Track But Continued Progress Needed on HIV Viral Suppression to Achieve Our Nation’s Goal | HIV.gov

    ​​​​​On Track But Continued Progress Needed on HIV Viral Suppression to Achieve Our Nation’s Goal | HIV.gov

    bar graph on viral suppression statistics over the years



    On Track But Continued Progress Needed on HIV Viral Suppression to Achieve Our Nation’s Goal

    November 15, 2017 - HIV.gov Blog

    TOPICS: NHAS, Viral Suppression
    The science is clear: recent scientific advances in our understanding of the impact of HIV treatment have shown that achieving and maintaining viral suppression improves the health of those living with HIV and prevents the transmission of new infections. Further, data modeling shows ... [READ MORE]